Popular Victorian Era Manners and Etiquettes for Girls

You may have discovered, the rules of etiquette are constantly changing and evolving. What is acceptable today may be seen as disrespectful or rude tomorrow. However in Victorian times, manners were considered a must to all within society and Victorian age manners were learnt from a young age.

For example a proper young woman had to grasp the rules of etiquette starting with how to walk down the street to how to eat fruit ever so gracefully. In fact, she took the time out to cut it gently with a silver knife and then cutting into segments so the fruit could fit in her mouth very easily. This may sound overdone for our day and age but back then the standard of Victorian manners and etiquette were set very high.

Etiquettes popular during the Victorian age:

Victorian girls were bought up in such a way to plan herself for a life devoted to looking after her house and family if she entered into wedlock, and charity if she decided not to. Also young women, though advised on the significance of getting a man, were advised to making their affections and feelings towards the opposite sex to obvious. Yet she was to remain meek and mild in order to be considered beautiful and her qualities to be looked upon favorably.

Invitations to dinner parties or events were to be sent seven to ten days in advance and should be returned by the recipient in just a week from when they got it. So they had to be careful to ensure they did not overrun their time slots or else someone may be getting crossed off the invitation list.

A very well known rule out of the Victorian manners and etiquette is a mans iconic gesture to tip their hat when greeting a woman, opening doors and walking on the outside. This is usually seen in our time, But the Victorians were there first.

Slices or rolls of bread must be broken into smaller pieces before eating.

The art of conversation was to listen carefully to what others were saying and wait your turn to speak, never interrupt. So monopolizing conversation was kept out of bounds.

Also see: Victorian Era Cooking And Kitchens
Victorian Era Cooking And Manners
Victorian Era Dinner Etiquettes
Aprons Of Victorian Era
Victorian Cooking Upperclass Dinner

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