Victorian Era Dinner Etiquettes and Manners

Etiquettes meanĀ a set of behavior that a person is expected to observe in the society. They are the rules for simple actions. They are the rules that a person is expected to follow while dealing with people in the society. They include a person’s habits along with his body language.

Victorian etiquettes
Victorian etiquettes

Manners before the meal

In the Victorian homes, meals times were the special times. During the Victorian era, there were different dinner etiquettes that were required to be followed. To begin with, coming properly dressed was the first thing. At the dinner parties, people were required to be formally dressed. Ladies were supposed to wear low-necked gowns with short sleeves along with the gloves. Men had to wear dark broadcloth along with fine linen.

As a part of the dinner etiquettes, each male man was assigned a female guest to escort into the dining hall. At the dinner parties of the Victorian era, the main goal of the female hostess was to display every piece of fine china, stemware and silver she owned. The hostess was to be escorted either by her husband’s best friend or his business partner. The host was supposed to escort the highest ranking lady, a newcomer to the area, a new bride of the wife of a distinguished guest.

After meal etiquettes

After the meal was over, the servants were supposed to serve the water-filled finger bowls, each containing a slice of lemon as a part of the etiquettes of the Victorian dinner parties. The hostess was supposed to end the party by making strong eye contact with the lady seated to the hosts right and then standing up.

The ladies were supposed to leave first and the men had to open the door to let the ladies retire to the drawing room. Afterward, the men either remained at the table for more conversation or headed towards the library to enjoy a fine cigar and a glass of port.

Also see: Victorian Era Cooking And Kitchens
Victorian Era Cooking And Manners
Victorian Era Dinner Etiquettes
Aprons Of Victorian Era
Victorian Cooking Upperclass Dinner

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